Author Archives: Deborah

Lemon Marmalade Cake

Zest the lemon peel before juicing

My publisher made a request for an orange loaf cake – he has a fond food memory of a cake his mother baked; redolent with orange in every bite, including on top of the cake.  So off to my collection of classic cookbooks I went, Fannie Farmer, James Beard, Joy of Cooking, etc; in search of a recipe that matched his recollection.  An online search yielded Melissa Clark’s Orange Marmalade Cake, that turned out a very orange-y, moist cake.  It’s always a risk to recreate a childhood food memory, lest it disappoint, so I diverged a bit with this lemon version of the cake.  It is darn tasty in its own right, and no one has refused a proffered slice to date.

 

These special cakes are perfect to serve when guests stop by, or for gift-giving that will surely please.  Their bright lemon-y-ness adds a fresh note to pair nicely with a “cuppa” of your choosing.

 

Marmalade chockfull with flavorful rind

When I shared this cake with neighbors, I was asked if I had made the marmalade from my garden’s lemons.  I had not, but appreciated the thought for a future project!  You will want to use a marmalade that is well made, meaning chockfull of lemon rind for this cake.  The results will suffer if you use a marmalade that is more pectin/jelly than rind.

 

I happened to have a jar of divine Meyer lemon marmalade from the Clif Family Kitchen in Napa Valley, procured during a recent visit to their St. Helena winery.  They produce mouth-watering preserves from fruits grown on their farm, and recently received recognition when their preserves were listed on “Oprah’s Favorite Things 2017” list.

 

If you are in the St. Helena area, I highly recommend a visit to Clif Family Winery.  I had a wonderful time there with friends tasting wines and having lunch from their Bruschetteria food truck.  Their retail shop carries their now famous preserves, along with other custom offerings.  I came away with preserves, olive oil, candied nuts, spices and, oh yes — wine.

 

If you cannot find lemon marmalade, using orange marmalade as the cake is originally conceived, is sure to please.  There is also a video of Melissa Clark preparing her cake, a bonus for those appreciating a refresher on techniques and tips.

Lemon Marmalade Cake

Adapted from Melissa Clark’s Orange Marmalade Cake

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup lemon marmalade, divided
  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened; plus 1/ 2 tablespoon for the glaze, and more for greasing the pan(s)
  • 1/ 2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1-1/ 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/ 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/ 2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/ 8 cup confectioners’ (powdered) sugar

Instructions

  1. Position an oven rack into the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350  Butter a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan, or use three mini loaf pans, approximately 3 x 6-inch size. Coarsely chop any extra-large pieces of peel in the marmalade.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, beat together softened butter, sugar and lemon zest until light and fluffy; about 5 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating after each until well incorporated.  Beat in 1/ 3 cup marmalade and the lemon juice.  Using a spatula, gently fold in the dry ingredients into the butter-sugar-egg mixture by hand, until no traces of flour show.
  4. Scrape batter into the prepared pan(s). Bake until the surface of the cake is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean; about 35 minutes for mini-pans or 50-55 minutes for one large pan.
  5. Remove from oven and transfer pan(s) to a wire rack. Cool 10 minutes, turn cake out of pans and place on a rack right-side up.  Place a rimmed baking sheet under the rack to catch any dripping glaze.
  6. Heat remaining 1/ 3 cup marmalade in a small pan over low heat until melted; whisk in confectioners’ sugar and 1/ 2 tablespoon of butter until smooth. Slather warm glaze over the top of the cake(s), allowing some to drizzle down the sides.  Cool completely before serving.

Note:  As with many cakes, this one will have the tenderest crumb if eaten on the day it is baked.  Next day the crumb is firmer, and the lemon-y-ness is both richer and mellower.  It’s all good!

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Thai-Style Stir-Fried Beef and Vegetables

Thai Basil

Sometimes that one-pound package of ground beef is begging for an inspired use.  It just sits there, daring me to come up with something slightly out of the norm to give it a sense of higher value.

 

I worked this up for a quick, weeknight meal with ingredients pretty much on hand.  It works with a variety of vegetables, although including Asian eggplant and Thai basil will increase its authenticity factor – should that matter to you.  Me?  I just want it to taste good.

 

The farmers at my local farmers market are still bringing in zucchini, eggplants, chiles and basil.  But the harvests are dwindling to a trickle now that we’re into autumn harvests.  Now is the time to give this a try, while these ingredients remain readily available.  I hope you can see the flexibility of this recipe and the wide variety of ingredients you can use.

So Many Eggplant Varieties!

 

A few advance tips:

Do not fret if you do not have Thai basil.  The dish will be delicious using whatever fresh basil you have.  Try adding fresh mint leaves to the basil for an interesting switch up.

 

The seeds and membrane of the jalapenos are where the most “heat” lives.  Remove these before mincing if taming the heat is important to you.  Also, wear gloves when handling spicy chiles, and avoid touching anywhere near your eyes if there has been any chile contact with your hands.

 

Fish sauce is a key ingredient for Southeast Asian cooking.  If you enjoy Thai, Vietnamese and similar cuisines, I highly recommend stocking fish sauce along with soy sauce.  Red Boat, the brand I use, has a 250-ml bottle that’s a good introduction to their product.  A little goes a long way.

 

Thai-Style Stir-Fried Beef and Vegetables

ingredients

  • 1 pound ground beef (substitute any ground meat or crumbled, firm tofu, as you prefer)
  • 1 pound zucchini and/or eggplant, diced into 1/ 3” cubes (about 2-3 medium zucchini and/or Asian eggplant); about 3+ cups
  • 1 cup fresh basil leaves, Thai basil if you have them; plus extra leaves for finishing
  • 1/ 2 cup onion, diced
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced; about 3 – 4 large cloves
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 jalapeno, serrano or Thai chile, minced; or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce, or to taste (I use Red Boat brand)
  • 1 – 2 teaspoons soy sauce, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
  • Fresh lime wedges
  • 2 tablespoons neutral vegetable oil for stir-frying
  • Whole lettuce leaves for serving, such as Bibb or similar pliable leaf variety

Instructions

  1. Heat a large, heavy skillet (or wok) over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of oil and let heat until it begins to “shimmer”.
  2. Add the onion, garlic, ginger, and chile (the “aromatics”); and stir-fry for just about one minute. Add the ground beef in several pieces and begin breaking it up in the pan with a spatula or wooden spoon.  The goal is to have crumbles of cooked beef that’s well-incorporated with the aromatics.  Remove the cooked beef and aromatics to a plate and set aside.
  3. Add the second 1 tablespoon of oil to the pan and let it heat up over medium-high heat. Add the zucchini and/or eggplant, stir-frying occasionally until lightly browned and nearly cooked through, about 5 – 8 minutes.
  4. Add the cooked beef mixture back into the pan; then add the fish sauce, soy sauce, and black pepper. Stir-fry to mix well, then lastly add the fresh basil leaves and give it a final stir to incorporate them.
  5. Remove from heat and serve in lettuce leaves or with steamed rice. Garnish with fresh basil leaves and include lime wedges for a fresh spritz of acidity to liven things up.

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Fresh Herbs and Garlic Cream Cheese Spread

Is it just me, or did September fly by?  I must have been ecstatic last month, (“Time flies when you’re having fun…”).  So it’s with a bit of a rush that I prepare this month’s Piedmont Pantry column for The Piedmont Post, because I blinked and my deadline is nigh.

 

As it turns out, this recipe is a nice metaphor for making the best when time is of the essence.  Surely you may find yourself in a similar position – the need to pull something together quickly to serve, with ingredients you may already have on hand; or are easy to gather.

 

High impact with minimal effort – there’s much to love about this easy, homemade cheese spread.  It’s always a crowd pleaser, slathered on sliced baguette, crackers or a variety of vegetables.  Best of all, it takes only a few minutes of chopping and mixing from start to finish.

 

The instructions say to refrigerate it for a couple of hours before serving to allow for the flavors to fully develop.  Truth be told, it’s perfectly delicious as soon as it’s made – as you will notice when cleaning up the bowl.

 

Cream cheese is a refrigerator staple in many homes, including ours.  Here we’re fond of cream cheese and smoked salmon on a bagel or toast.  An unopened package of cream cheese will last several months in the ‘fridge.  So why not keep it on hand?

 

I have a small herb garden, in pots, in our back yard.  It’s easy-peasy for me to head out and snip away as needed.  Bits and pieces from your garden or refrigerator are fine here.

 

This recipe is flexible.  Mix and match the herbs to suit your taste or availability at hand.  Try using other soft, spreadable cheeses such as fromage blanc, chèvre, or ricotta.

 

And it’s scalable.  Make only a fraction of the recipe to use up a bit of cream cheese you have, or multiply it for a crowd.  Soon you will be whipping up your own versions on instinct, with no recipe required.

 

Bonus:  This cheese spread is also delicious on pasta.  Boil pasta to desired doneness.  Drain, reserving at least 1/ 2 cup of the boiling liquid.  Add cheese spread to taste and mix until evenly distributed.  A few splashes of the reserved pasta water will help loosen up the sauce and make for a luscious coating on the pasta.  Serve with a generous scattering of grated Parmesan cheese and flourish of more fresh herbs.

 

Fresh Herbs & Garlic Cream Cheese Spread

Makes about 1 cup

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1 – 2 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chives, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs, finely chopped (Basil, marjoram, and thyme; alone or in combination, are all delicious.)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, start with about 1/ 4 teaspoon each

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Combine the cream cheese and butter in a medium mixing bowl and blend well until they are smooth. This can be done by hand, or with an electric mixer or food processor.  Fold in the garlic and herbs.  Taste and season with salt and pepper to your preference.
  2. Transfer to serving bowl or ramekins, cover and chill in the refrigerator for several hours; up to 2 days.
  3. Serve with sliced breads, crackers, sliced vegetables – whatever you like. It will soften up at room temperature, making it not only spreadable, but “dip-able” with a sturdy celery or carrot stick.

Slather-Worthy

 

Few and fresh ingredients

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Summertime Fruit Cake

There is a slight Goldilocks’ attitude to my preference for a summer time cake featuring fruit.  Not too dense and not to light, but a medium textured, moist cake that seems just right for a satisfying sweet treat during our late summer heat.

 

If you are a baker, or a fan of simple fruit cakes, you may already be acquainted with Marion Burros’ iconic Original Plum Torte.  It is said to be the New York Times’ most requested recipe, and indeed, was published every September for seven years back in the 1980’s.  Now that’s serious lasting power, and apt appreciation for a genius cake.

 

Ms. Burros also encourages home bakers to experiment with our own adaptations, and this is one of mine.  Over the years my family has enjoyed several variations, but we seem to especially appreciate using peaches and/or nectarines.

 

This cake, which is pretty forgiving when it comes to making substitutions, is a brilliant showcase for perfectly ripe stone fruits.  The other bonus for making this now – many of these fruits are at seasonal low pricing from your local farmers.

 

I hope you’ll give this cake a whirl.  There are only five, FIVE, actual mixing steps to it; fairly short for an outstanding outcome.

A few advance notes:

A combination of two medium peaches and one medium nectarine. Freestone fruit is important here.

  • Experience shows me that fruit sliced on the thinner, 1/ 3-inch side, yields for a baked cake with most of the fruit showing. If this appearance appeals, then you’ll be glad for the tip.  Slightly thicker slices of fruit results in a perfectly delicious cake that shows more cake than fruit on top.  You can always garnish with a bit more fruit, or a dollop of whipped cream.

  • Don’t overdo it with overlapping the sliced fruit. The rising cake batter needs somewhere to go.  You don’t want to weigh it down so much that you end up with a stodgy cake that couldn’t rise for the heft of the fruit topping.

A stunner — If I do say so myself!

 

Summer Fruit Cake with Peaches and Nectarines

Inspired by Marion Burros’ Plum Torte

Makes one 9” round cake

INGREDIENTS

  • 1-1/ 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/ 2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/ 4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/ 2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/ 2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 eggs, room temperature
  • 1/ 2 cup whole milk yogurt, room temperature (substitute sour cream)
  • 3 medium peaches or nectarines, or large plums
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, freshly squeezed
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/ 2 teaspoon cinnamon or ginger or “Dusk” spice blend
  • 1 tablespoon Turbinado sugar, or any coarse grind sugar
  • Additional butter for the pan

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Position an oven rack into the center of the oven, preheat oven to 350° Line the bottom of a 9-inch springform pan with parchment.  Make sure the pan is securely fastened, then generously butter the sides of the pan.  Set aside.
  2. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a small bowl. Set aside.
  3. Slice the fruit lengthwise and remove the pit. Slice into about 1/ 3” to 1/ 2” thick wedges.  Place in a medium sized bowl; add the lemon juice, lemon zest and spice.  Stir gently to evenly coat the fruit.  Set aside.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, using a handheld electric mixer, cream the butter until smooth. Add the sugar and beat on medium until light and fluffy.  Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each.  Add the vanilla.
  5. Add one-half of the flour mix, blend in slightly; then add one-half of the yogurt. Repeat with the remaining flour mix and yogurt, taking care to just mix thoroughly, but do not over beat the batter.  The batter will be thick.
  6. Pour the batter into the prepared springform pan, leveling it with a spatula. Arrange the sliced fruit atop, avoiding too many overlapped pieces.  It is okay if some batter is uncovered, where it will rise during baking.
  7. Bake for about one hour. Test doneness by inserting a toothpick into the center of the cake.  If it comes out clean, with no batter clinging to it, the cake is ready.  Remove and place on a wire rack to cool.  After 10 minutes, remove the sides of the pan.
  8. May be served slightly warm, or completely cooled. Finish with additional fresh fruit, or a dollop of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.  Any leftover, good luck with that, makes delicious breakfast fare.

More photos because this cake is so lovely

Now it’s time to eat from the photo session!

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